Tag Archives: cat fleas

How to prepare the house for Flea Fumigation

Flea problems are more common than you might imagine, particularly in homes shared with cats or dogs. Your pet only has to brush against an infected animal for fleas to hop from one fur coat to another, giving you a pest control problem.

While minor Flea Infestations can be solved by treatment of the affected area or pet, if your home seems to be teeming with fleas, fumigation is the best solution.

To get the most effective results, it’s important to know how to prepare the house for flea fumigation.

If you are moving into a new property where the previous residents had pets, you may want to consider fumigating before moving in. Whether you do it yourself or employ a pest control expert, it will be easier to carry out when the property is empty.

Preparing your house for flea fumigation

If your pets are likely to be carrying fleas, these must be dealt with before any fumigation is carried out. Use all appropriate flea treatments and perform regular checks to ensure the problem has been effectively dealt with. Change or clean pet bedding regularly.

With your pets cleaned up, you can focus on preparing the house by carrying out thorough vacuuming of all carpets and hard surfaces. Take care to vacuum right to the edge of floors, as flea eggs often fall into crevices in skirting boards. Empty the vacuum cleaner immediately after each clean.

All rugs should be taken outdoors and beaten and, if possible, washed.

Make arrangements for alternative accommodation for yourself and your pets on the day of the fumigation. It will take several hours for the entire process to be completed.

If you are conducting the fumigation yourself, read all the instructions of the products carefully some days before you use them, in order that you can be fully prepared. When a pest control expert is involved, seek clear instructions in advance and take care to follow these.

Some of the chemicals used in the fumigation process could be harmful to your pets, so do all you can to ensure their safety.

On the day of flea fumigation

There are a number of different products which tackle serious flea pest control problems. Sprays can be applied to carpets, killing fleas hidden in the fibres and leaving a residue which inhibits their return for several weeks.

An alternative to spray is the flea bomb, which sounds more dramatic than it is. The flea bomb is a device which fills the air with a fine spray of pesticide, which disperses across a room over a few hours.

These fumigation techniques can be combined for maximum effect, but both require you to be absent from your home for several hours. Upon return, you’ll need to carefully follow the instructions about cleaning surfaces, for your own safety and also to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment.

If you have any questions or concerns about how to prepare the house for flea fumigation, talk to a pest control expert. Eradicating fleas can be a time-consuming and frustrating process if not conducted correctly, and you’ll want to do all you can to reduce disruption and inconvenience in your home.

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What to do after Flea Extermination

Even when your premises have undergone a thorough Fleas Extermination process, there is no guarantee that the pests will not be back. Fleas are particularly hardy pests, with the capacity to remain dormant for years before reviving when they sense potential food sources nearby.

Where pest control measures have entirely eliminated the flea population, preventing their return means identifying and closing their routes into your premises. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done, as fleas are often spread by being carried in the fur of dogs or cats.

However, there are measures you can take to reduce the chances of flea problems reoccurring.

Pest control actions after flea extermination

There are several different types of flea but all have common characteristics. In particular, they all feed on the blood of different types of animal, and spread by laying eggs which often fall from the host.

This means it is just as important to deal with flea eggs as it is to tackle the adult fleas. The eggs will fall from the host, usually a cat or dog, at any point during the day. A high proportion is found in their bedding, but a number will be spread across the rest of the area they move in, such as your home or workplace.

These eggs are invisible to the naked eye. To remove them before they have a chance to hatch you should:

  • Where possible, put animal bedding on hard surfaces.
  • Regularly wash pet bedding, ideally each week and at high temperature.
  • Vacuum soft furnishings which the animals come into contact with.
  • Groom your pet while it stands on a hard floor or even a white sheet, where dislodged fleas and their eggs will be visible.

Be alert to the signs of a flea problem

While fleas can spread diseases, the main problem they cause is skin irritation in the host animal. This is usually a cat or dog, but can occasionally be a human.

The irritation is due to the flea bites. These become itchy, causing the host considerable discomfort. A clue that your cat or dog may be carrying fleas is regular scratching of the same part of the body, often in an irritated manner.

Small children are at a higher risk of being bitten by fleas, as they have much more contact with floor surfaces. Some could be allergic to flea bites, giving them an itchy rash on their skin.

If you are a pet owner, there will always be a chance of a flea problem reoccurring. Even if you keep your own pets scrupulously clean, they could pick up fleas through contact with other animals, or from animals visiting your home or place of work.

The best way to stop fleas from becoming a problem is to know what to do after flea extermination, and to take consistent pest control and prevention measures.

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