Monthly Archives: May 2012

When do feral pigeons lay eggs?

Feral pigeons create a nuisance with their continual scavenging for food and their unsightly droppings, which can be extremely damaging to stone, brick and wood. They also carry a variety of parasites and diseases, some of which can be harmful to humans.

If you have a Pigeon Pest Control problem, knowing when and how the birds breed will help you to find a solution.

Like so many of the other pests that live in London, feral pigeons are capable of breeding all year round. Captive bred pigeons can lay a new batch of eggs every month, but their feral cousins typically produce between two and four broods a year.

Pigeon pest control by preventing nesting

While pigeons can lay their eggs at any time of year, they are more likely to nest during the spring and summer months, when the weather is warmer. Making it impossible for the birds to nest at this time of year is an important step in a pigeon removal strategy.

Feral pigeons usually build their nests on ledges outside or inside buildings. Being descended from Rock Doves, who live wild around coastal cliffs or in mountainous areas, they have learned to exploit the nooks and crevices in tall city constructions. It’s this ability to build nests in urban areas that has led to a pigeon pest control problem in London and other towns and cities.

Roof spaces are a particular favourite, being high, and full of beams and other flat surfaces. Here the birds can lay their eggs, undisturbed and usually sheltered from extreme weather. The eggs hatch within three weeks of being laid and the squabs, or baby pigeons, are able to fly within a month.

Within six months, they join the breeding population, creating a new generation of pigeon pests.

How to stop feral pigeons building nests

Where pigeons are nesting inside roof voids and other spaces, this can be stopped by the use of deterrents, or completely preventing access.

A variety of devices are available which discourage feral pigeons and other bird pests from taking up residence, including plastic bird spikes, brightly-coloured bird-scarers or even inflatable models of predators. Where specific access points are identified, such as broken windows, these can be repaired or covered by netting.

Pigeon spikes and bird-repellent gel can also be used on the outside of buildings. Spikes make it impossible to land, or uncomfortable to roost, while pigeons don’t like the feel of tacky bird-repellent gel. This ensures they won’t want to stay around long enough to build a nest or lay eggs.

While you can take some pigeon pest control measures yourself, using a professional pest controller brings the added benefit of years of experience. As with all pests, feral pigeons have particular habits and preferences and an expert will be able to supply the most cost-effective, and long-lasting, solution to your pigeon problem.

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How common is it to have Mice in London?

You might be surprised at how many homes and businesses in London take Mice Pest Control measures from time to time.

Not everyone likes to admit that they have a problem with mice, particularly if they are running a business that involves the production or sale of food. Some of your neighbours could be unwilling to admit they have taken steps to get rid of mice, as they are concerned about giving a poor impression of their domestic cleanliness.

But needing to take mice removal measures is not something to be embarrassed about. These tiny, always hungry and fast-breeding Rodents can squeeze through almost impossibly small gaps in their endless search for food. Even the cleanest house, kitchen or store is at risk if they discover a way in.

Mice pest control starts before the rodents arrive

It’s almost inevitable that mice will be living somewhere near your home or business premises. The diverse architecture of London leaves many buildings susceptible to mouse infestation. There is an endless supply of cracked bricks and pipes which leave gaps big enough for these nimble rodents to get through.

One of the best pest control measures you can take against mice is to stop them finding a way in. Visual inspection of your property is a good start, especially if this is carried out by a pest control expert, who will be able to make you aware of potential entry points you might not have considered.

Another easy step is to make sure all potential sources of food are inaccessible to mice. They chew their way through paper, cardboard and even wood to get to a meal. Securing food in plastic or metal containers will keep them out. Keeping your home or businesses premises clean will reduce the amount of food waste lying around, providing mice with less of an incentive to find a way in.

Get rid of mice as soon as you spot the problem

Unhygienic and unsightly, mice can also do considerable damage to your property once inside. They’ll pull out insulation from inside walls and lofts, makes nests in stored textiles, and can even create electrical problems by chewing wires.

All of which means it’s important to get rid of mice the moment they arrive. Because they are a common pest control problem, there is no shortage of options available. Poison, traps and electronic deterrents are just some of your choices.

Do-it-yourself pest control measures will often get rid of mice if they have not had much time to breed. A well-established infestation can be much harder to remove, because of both the number of mice and the variety of hiding places they will have created for themselves.

It can be surprisingly common to have mice in your London property. But they can usually be removed relatively quickly and easily, and with the right actions, you can prevent mice from returning.

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What to do after Flea Extermination

Even when your premises have undergone a thorough Fleas Extermination process, there is no guarantee that the pests will not be back. Fleas are particularly hardy pests, with the capacity to remain dormant for years before reviving when they sense potential food sources nearby.

Where pest control measures have entirely eliminated the flea population, preventing their return means identifying and closing their routes into your premises. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done, as fleas are often spread by being carried in the fur of dogs or cats.

However, there are measures you can take to reduce the chances of flea problems reoccurring.

Pest control actions after flea extermination

There are several different types of flea but all have common characteristics. In particular, they all feed on the blood of different types of animal, and spread by laying eggs which often fall from the host.

This means it is just as important to deal with flea eggs as it is to tackle the adult fleas. The eggs will fall from the host, usually a cat or dog, at any point during the day. A high proportion is found in their bedding, but a number will be spread across the rest of the area they move in, such as your home or workplace.

These eggs are invisible to the naked eye. To remove them before they have a chance to hatch you should:

  • Where possible, put animal bedding on hard surfaces.
  • Regularly wash pet bedding, ideally each week and at high temperature.
  • Vacuum soft furnishings which the animals come into contact with.
  • Groom your pet while it stands on a hard floor or even a white sheet, where dislodged fleas and their eggs will be visible.

Be alert to the signs of a flea problem

While fleas can spread diseases, the main problem they cause is skin irritation in the host animal. This is usually a cat or dog, but can occasionally be a human.

The irritation is due to the flea bites. These become itchy, causing the host considerable discomfort. A clue that your cat or dog may be carrying fleas is regular scratching of the same part of the body, often in an irritated manner.

Small children are at a higher risk of being bitten by fleas, as they have much more contact with floor surfaces. Some could be allergic to flea bites, giving them an itchy rash on their skin.

If you are a pet owner, there will always be a chance of a flea problem reoccurring. Even if you keep your own pets scrupulously clean, they could pick up fleas through contact with other animals, or from animals visiting your home or place of work.

The best way to stop fleas from becoming a problem is to know what to do after flea extermination, and to take consistent pest control and prevention measures.

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