Monthly Archives: April 2011

A Pigeon’s Eye View of the Royal Wedding Procession

As William and Kate’s big day approaches, we decided to celebrate by taking a slightly different perspective on some of the sites they’ll pass during their horse-drawn trip from the Abbey to the Palace.

Westminster Abbey

Pigeons love medieval churches, particularly the soaring cathedrals with their towers and spires, wide ledges and cosy crevices. However, the birds aren’t particularly welcome on ecclesiastical property, either inside or out, despite making a number of appearances in the Bible.

In the thousand years since Westminster’s construction, pigeons have faced an increasing range of deterrents including rows of anti-roosting spikes, acres of netting, and a variety of Bird Scarers.

Whilst weddings are traditionally accompanied by symbols of good luck, measures will be taken to ensure that pigeons won’t be able to deposit their own sign of best wishes on the bride and groom.

Downing Street

Larry might be the latest and Humphrey the most well-known, but they’re simply some of the latest in a distinguished line of cats appointed as government pest controllers. The first Treasury mouser documented in history was owned by Cardinal Wolsey, who kept it by his side as Lord Chancellor, during the reign of Henry VIII.

The Cenotaph

As the wedding procession passes the focal point of national remembrance for fallen British servicemen, it’s good to recall that not all pigeons are thought of as pests. In fact, over 30 have been awarded the Dickin Medal for displaying conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in support of military forces.

Horse Guards Parade

This royal parade ground is no stranger to spectator events, hosting the Trouping of the Colour, displays in honour of the Queen’s birthday and, in 2012, it’ll be transformed into an Olympic volley ball arena. But according to Westminster City Council pest control experts, the number of rats watching events is down on previous years.

Steve Harrison, Westminster’s director of premises management, recently said: “We pride ourselves on acting quickly and will continue our work to limit the number of rats and other vermin in the city.”

Buckingham Palace

Tight security at the royal residence hasn’t kept uninvited guests out of the royal kitchens. With pantries and larders groaning under enough goodies to serve up to 600 people at one sitting, it’s no surprise that rats and mice want a slice of Windsor pudding, pie, cake or even just a plain cracker.

A royal Rodent Problem occurred as recently as October last year. However, the only teeth nibbling at the delicacies of William and Kate’s wedding breakfast will be those of their chosen guests.

The rest of us will have to make do with street party fare, bank holiday barbecues or whatever else comes our way.

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Spring Time in London Brings Pest Control Problems

The last of the March daffodils are fading and the bluebells are bursting into colour. The Boat Race is behind us while the Chelsea Flower Show and Wimbledon are getting closer. Spring is well under way in London.

But it’s not just plants and trees coming to life in the city’s parks and gardens. Ants and Flies, two of the most common household pests, are also waking up. Millions of tiny, irritating and unhygienic insects are preparing for another summer of infestation across London.

If your home or workplace suffered from these insect pests last year, the time to act is now. By catching the problem early, you could spare yourself a summer of insect nuisance.

Ants can be a tricky pest control problem

These tiny insects are easy to spot as they forage outside their nests. Unfortunately, they can prove difficult to get rid of.

Ants perform a useful function outdoors, helping to clear up all sorts of debris. But if they find their way into your office or home they become a serious Pest Control problem. They’re constantly searching for food and they can find their way in through tiny holes in walls and floors.

There are various poisons available off the shelf which can help to keep their numbers down. But if you have a major infestation and want a quick solution, you’ll need professional help.

Flies can carry diseases very easily

There are about 6,500 species of fly in Britain. Unfortunately some of the most common, such as the housefly or bluebottle, are also some of the dirtiest. They’re attracted to rotting or decayed material but will also alight, moments later, on fresh food and clean surfaces.

They transport tiny particles of rotting matter from place to place very easily. This can include bacteria which can cause anything from a mild stomach upset to typhoid fever, cholera, dysentery or a host of other unpleasant illnesses.

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