Category Archives: Pest control

Bypest London Pest Control Services – helping you get rid of Residential Pest problems

If you have a problem with pest control, we can help. We cover both commercial and residential pest management. Our technicians know what is needed for successful, effective Pest Control.

We offer a free site survey to assess what is needed and formulate a plan especially to deal with your issue, providing you with a quotation for the work.

Our cost-effective service can tackle pest control and prevention on any scale – whether it’s a wasp nest at your home or an environmental issue at a large business.

Our staff can help with any enquiry, even if you are not sure of the type of pest or the scale of the problem.  As well as pest extermination and control, we provide rodent and insect proofing to make sure your home or business remains pest free.

No-fuss pest extermination

Our discreet and professional service means you are in good hands.

At Bypest, we always:

• Use approved and tested pesticides when needed

• Comply with all health and safety standards and legislation

• Conduct comprehensive risk assessments

• Maintain the highest level of training and understanding across our fully-qualified staff

Pest Control Services

We value customer service and all enquiries to Bypest are answered within two hours. Our complete service includes assessment, treatment and prevention of London Pest Control issues.

Below are the main types of pest that our technicians deal with.

Rats Control  

Signs that you may have a rat infestation include seeing holes, droppings, or notice the damage caused by chewing. Rats are nocturnal, so you won’t necessarily see the rats themselves. Common types of rat that you may have a problem with include the Norway rat and the ship rat. We have the expertise to deal with Rats Control, however big the problem is.

Mice Control

Mice will often cause lots of damage, nibbling on and spoiling food, and leaving urine and droppings. Like many pests, mice are unhygienic and can pass on disease, so it’s particularly important to take mice control seriously at a place of business.

Mice will often nest in undisturbed parts of a home or building. Our knowledgeable technicians know how to find and treat a mice infestation.

Cockroaches Control

The presence of cockroaches can cause terrible damage to a business’s reputation, let alone the actual damage they cause and potential to spread disease.

If you have a problem with cockroaches, call us at Bypest. We understand their behaviour, where they are likely to be nesting, and how to deal with them.

Wasps Control

Wasps can be aggressive and sting and any wasp infestation or nest should always be treated with caution. Different species of wasps will act in different ways.

Wasps will often nest in bushes, lofts and wall cavities. Never try to block up a hole if you think it leads to a nest, and never remove the nest yourself. Our fully qualified technicians can safely remove wasps nests from your home or business.

Flies Control

Flies are an unsanitary pest as they spread disease by moving from rotting food, to rubbish, to food and cutlery that are exposed.

We are all used to seeing flies around seasonally, but a professional pest control company should be used for larger infestations.

Fleas Control

Fleas lay their eggs in carpets, on our pets, and even on bedding and clothing. Warm homes provide a perfect temperature for them to breed.

Signs of a flea problem include your pet scratching itself and noticing tiny specks of dirt that are flea faeces. Fleas can also bite people, causing itchy and irritated skin.

Our effective flea control considers not just your pet but how fleas live in the home and how to remove them for good.

Moths Control

Moths can cause a lot of damage during the larval stage. Larvae may have been carried into your home or business via clothing, food or furniture.

At Bypest, we can asses any moth issue you have. We will locate the source of the problem and remove it.

Bedbugs Control

Often the sign of a bedbug problem is seeing their skin or their droppings. We can tackle bedbug problems with our safe, integrated bedbugs removal service.

If you are concerned about a possible bedbug infestation, give us a call. We provide professional bedbugs fumigation for hotels and bed and breakfasts in London and the M25. We can also help with bedbug prevention measures.

Pigeons Control

Pigeons are a nuisance with their droppings, noise and, as pigeons can pass on disease to humans, are seen as an unhygienic blight.

If you have a pigeon or avian problem at your business or home, Bypest can help. Our pigeon prevention measures include wires, spikes and netting to stop pigeons gathering and fouling at your business premises.

Ants Control

We can assess and advise on an ant a problem at your home or business, including the removal of nests. Sometimes adjoining buildings will need to be treated, our fully qualified staff can advise on this.

Using effective methods, we can eliminate ant colonies and deter ants from nesting in your building.

Squirrels Control

A squirrel nest can be found in lofts, voids and wall cavities. Like rats, squirrels will gnaw and can cause damage to buildings.

Unlike the red squirrel, the grey squirrel is prevalent in the UK and is not a protected species. Our fully qualified team can remove squirrels from lofts and buildings and advise on prevention measures.

Bypest London Pest Control Company  offers a Comprehensive Pest Control Services for all kind of Pest Control Problems throughout London and around M25 Area.

Do Rats hibernate during the Winter?

You might think that pest control work quietens down during the winter, because quite a few nuisance animals and insects go into hibernation.

But lots of household pests, including rats and mice, remain active all year round. The longer and colder winter nights make your home, garden and workplace more attractive to these rodents, who are always looking for food, and for somewhere warm and dry to nest.

Wasps and other insect pests might become almost invisible during the winter months, but they’re simply dormant and will be back next spring. Colder weather gives you a chance to deal with holes and gaps where they may have nested this year, helping prevent their return.

Pest control during the winter months

Taking action to prevent rats and other pests is as important during the winter as at any other time of year. The most basic precautions include not leaving any food outdoors overnight, and keeping food preparation and storage areas clean and tidy.

Leftover pet food or food spillages, indoors or out, are hugely attractive to rats and mice looking for something to eat.

Another simple pest control task is to tidy up your garden or other outdoor area. Piles of wood or dry leaves can quickly become comfortable homes for rodents. Compost bins are particularly popular, especially if you put food scraps into them.

Outbuildings, such as sheds and children’s playhouses, can also become places of safety for rats and mice. Here they can live undisturbed for weeks at a time, protected from the extremes of the British winter climate. Make it part of your winter routine to check these buildings, and to fill any obvious cracks or gaps through which rodents could get in.

Indoor pests thrive during the winter

Fleas, moths and bedbugs are common indoor pests that don’t pay much attention to what the weather’s doing outside. Whatever the time of year, they continue breeding and spreading themselves around your home or workplace.

The cooler temperatures slow down their reproduction, but our centrally-heated buildings protect them from the cold. Because they live off us and our pets, fleas and bedbugs have more opportunity to spread during the winter, as we spend more time indoors.

Cockroaches, the scourge of many kitchens, also continue to be active during the winter months. In the event that they find themselves short of food, they can, like many pests, survive for a long time on virtually nothing.

Many people think that because pests are not seen so often during the winter, they are less of a problem. Some even believe that rats and mice do hibernate. But experienced pest controllers know that winter is as busy a time of year as any, and that it’s also a good time to act to prevent more serious pest issues from occurring in the spring.

How common are Rats in houses in London?

Every few months sees a new story appear in the media about rats in houses in London. These tales can be worrying, particularly if you know that rats are a problem in your area. Unfortunately, rats can be a common issue in houses where the basic principles of pest prevention are overlooked.

The Norway rat, also known as the brown rat, lives all over London. They make their nests anywhere they can find, including old drains, in burrows or in buildings. They have an excellent sense of smell and they are always looking for food. Being extremely agile, they can climb, jump swim or dig their way into places where they think they will find something to eat.

Problems rats cause in houses

Rats are not just unpleasant to look at, they also damage property and carry disease. They can get into London houses of any age, although it’s usually easier for them to get into older properties. Broken pipes, gaps in brickwork and the spaces between floors and walls can all become real rat runs. Here the rodents can scurry out of sight, finding their way all over a house.

Out of sight in these places, rats can do considerable damage. They can chew through wood and electrical cables, as well as into containers, causing a variety of different problems. They also spread the germs that they carry.

The most common infection associated with rats is Weil’s disease, which is potentially fatal. They can also cause food poisoning by contaminating surfaces and stores with their droppings.

Rats have been known to bite people in houses. The rodents can be bold in their search for food and have sharp dirty teeth that they will use to defend themselves.

Signs of rats in houses

When rats are a common problem in a house, there will be no shortage of evidence. Even if the rodents themselves remain out of the sight, they will leave obvious signs of their presence, such as gnawed boxes of cereal and other foods, smeary marks on surfaces and footprints. They also leave a distinctive, unpleasant smell.

If you are concerned about rats getting into your house, take a look at all the possible entry points. Small gaps in the walls and old pipes are common ways for them to get in. A professional pest controller will have the experience to spot potential entry points, and will know the signs of rat activity.

Rats Pest Control in London houses

By taking a few simple precautions, you can dramatically reduce the chances of a rat getting into your house. The most basic is to make sure all sources of food are in sealed containers that rats cannot get into. It is the smell of food, including food waste, that attracts the attention of these unpleasant rodents. So keeping your house clean and not leaving food lying around, either for you or your pets, is a big step towards Rats Pest control.

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How to prepare the house for Flea Fumigation

Flea problems are more common than you might imagine, particularly in homes shared with cats or dogs. Your pet only has to brush against an infected animal for fleas to hop from one fur coat to another, giving you a pest control problem.

While minor Flea Infestations can be solved by treatment of the affected area or pet, if your home seems to be teeming with fleas, fumigation is the best solution.

To get the most effective results, it’s important to know how to prepare the house for flea fumigation.

If you are moving into a new property where the previous residents had pets, you may want to consider fumigating before moving in. Whether you do it yourself or employ a pest control expert, it will be easier to carry out when the property is empty.

Preparing your house for flea fumigation

If your pets are likely to be carrying fleas, these must be dealt with before any fumigation is carried out. Use all appropriate flea treatments and perform regular checks to ensure the problem has been effectively dealt with. Change or clean pet bedding regularly.

With your pets cleaned up, you can focus on preparing the house by carrying out thorough vacuuming of all carpets and hard surfaces. Take care to vacuum right to the edge of floors, as flea eggs often fall into crevices in skirting boards. Empty the vacuum cleaner immediately after each clean.

All rugs should be taken outdoors and beaten and, if possible, washed.

Make arrangements for alternative accommodation for yourself and your pets on the day of the fumigation. It will take several hours for the entire process to be completed.

If you are conducting the fumigation yourself, read all the instructions of the products carefully some days before you use them, in order that you can be fully prepared. When a pest control expert is involved, seek clear instructions in advance and take care to follow these.

Some of the chemicals used in the fumigation process could be harmful to your pets, so do all you can to ensure their safety.

On the day of flea fumigation

There are a number of different products which tackle serious flea pest control problems. Sprays can be applied to carpets, killing fleas hidden in the fibres and leaving a residue which inhibits their return for several weeks.

An alternative to spray is the flea bomb, which sounds more dramatic than it is. The flea bomb is a device which fills the air with a fine spray of pesticide, which disperses across a room over a few hours.

These fumigation techniques can be combined for maximum effect, but both require you to be absent from your home for several hours. Upon return, you’ll need to carefully follow the instructions about cleaning surfaces, for your own safety and also to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment.

If you have any questions or concerns about how to prepare the house for flea fumigation, talk to a pest control expert. Eradicating fleas can be a time-consuming and frustrating process if not conducted correctly, and you’ll want to do all you can to reduce disruption and inconvenience in your home.

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What foods or smells do Rats or voles avoid?

One of the most effective ways to prevent rats or voles becoming a pest control problem is to discourage them from approaching your property. Traps and poisons will catch or kill at least some of the rodents when they arrive, but making your premises unattractive can be more cost-effective, and less unpleasant.

Knowing what foods or smells rats or voles avoid will help to keep them away. How effective any particular odours are at deterring these rodents will depend on the circumstances, such as the availability of food sources and the hardiness of the particular pests.

Peppermint. Some rats and voles will avoid the smell of peppermint. Soaking cotton wool balls in peppermint oil or sprinkling it on the areas where the rodents are known to run can act as a deterrent and encourage them to find alternative food sources. Natural peppermint may also help deter rats and voles but it is not always effective.

Cat litter. Cats are natural predators of rats and voles and these pests will instinctively avoid areas which are scented with the smell of feline urine. Having a cat may be sufficient to deter rodents from making their nests in your home or office as they will naturally produce the smell alerting them to the presence of a potential enemy. The use of ammonia on cat litter increases the pungency of the aroma, increasing the likelihood that it will deter rats and voles.

Predator urine. An alternative to cat litter is the use of a pest repellent that combines the urine of rodent predators such as cats, foxes, weasels and ferrets with other organic substances to form pellets. The smell fools the rats and voles into thinking that their enemies are nearby, which encourages them to stay away.

Other repellent smells. There are several other odours that may deter rats and voles from settling in your property. Moth balls can work, but are not recommended for long-term use because of their potential effect on human health. Another repelling odour is that of toilet cakes – the strongly scented blocks designed to keep toilet bowls fresh. Broken into pieces, the smell that they give off may repel rats and voles. Garlic and castor oil have also been known to work.

Repelling plants. Some plants act as a natural deterrent of voles – such as castor beans, marigolds, daffodils, alliums including onions, and caper spurge.

What do rats and voles eat?

Rats have a very keen sense of smell and are able to sniff out food from over a mile away. They are omnivorous, meaning they eat anything that humans do, from cereals to vegetables, and bread to fat. They will also eat pet food stored in boxes or bags.

Voles eat a mostly vegetarian diet. This includes plants, grass, roots and bulbs as well as berries, seeds, nuts, fungi and fruit. Vole colonies can strip bark off trees and devour fields of crops. They will occasionally eat snails and insects, but usually only when other food is scarce.

Storing food within airtight containers will help reduce the spread of odours which could attract the attention of vermin.

Will smells get rid of rats and voles?

Whilst these smells may help prevent rats and voles from settling in your property, they won’t solve a rat or vole infestation. For this, you’ll need a pest control strategy that eliminates access to food as well as killing or driving the vermin away. A professional pest controller will be able to assess what action is required and eradicate the problem before further damage occurs.

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When do feral pigeons lay eggs?

Feral pigeons create a nuisance with their continual scavenging for food and their unsightly droppings, which can be extremely damaging to stone, brick and wood. They also carry a variety of parasites and diseases, some of which can be harmful to humans.

If you have a Pigeon Pest Control problem, knowing when and how the birds breed will help you to find a solution.

Like so many of the other pests that live in London, feral pigeons are capable of breeding all year round. Captive bred pigeons can lay a new batch of eggs every month, but their feral cousins typically produce between two and four broods a year.

Pigeon pest control by preventing nesting

While pigeons can lay their eggs at any time of year, they are more likely to nest during the spring and summer months, when the weather is warmer. Making it impossible for the birds to nest at this time of year is an important step in a pigeon removal strategy.

Feral pigeons usually build their nests on ledges outside or inside buildings. Being descended from Rock Doves, who live wild around coastal cliffs or in mountainous areas, they have learned to exploit the nooks and crevices in tall city constructions. It’s this ability to build nests in urban areas that has led to a pigeon pest control problem in London and other towns and cities.

Roof spaces are a particular favourite, being high, and full of beams and other flat surfaces. Here the birds can lay their eggs, undisturbed and usually sheltered from extreme weather. The eggs hatch within three weeks of being laid and the squabs, or baby pigeons, are able to fly within a month.

Within six months, they join the breeding population, creating a new generation of pigeon pests.

How to stop feral pigeons building nests

Where pigeons are nesting inside roof voids and other spaces, this can be stopped by the use of deterrents, or completely preventing access.

A variety of devices are available which discourage feral pigeons and other bird pests from taking up residence, including plastic bird spikes, brightly-coloured bird-scarers or even inflatable models of predators. Where specific access points are identified, such as broken windows, these can be repaired or covered by netting.

Pigeon spikes and bird-repellent gel can also be used on the outside of buildings. Spikes make it impossible to land, or uncomfortable to roost, while pigeons don’t like the feel of tacky bird-repellent gel. This ensures they won’t want to stay around long enough to build a nest or lay eggs.

While you can take some pigeon pest control measures yourself, using a professional pest controller brings the added benefit of years of experience. As with all pests, feral pigeons have particular habits and preferences and an expert will be able to supply the most cost-effective, and long-lasting, solution to your pigeon problem.

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How common is it to have Mice in London?

You might be surprised at how many homes and businesses in London take Mice Pest Control measures from time to time.

Not everyone likes to admit that they have a problem with mice, particularly if they are running a business that involves the production or sale of food. Some of your neighbours could be unwilling to admit they have taken steps to get rid of mice, as they are concerned about giving a poor impression of their domestic cleanliness.

But needing to take mice removal measures is not something to be embarrassed about. These tiny, always hungry and fast-breeding Rodents can squeeze through almost impossibly small gaps in their endless search for food. Even the cleanest house, kitchen or store is at risk if they discover a way in.

Mice pest control starts before the rodents arrive

It’s almost inevitable that mice will be living somewhere near your home or business premises. The diverse architecture of London leaves many buildings susceptible to mouse infestation. There is an endless supply of cracked bricks and pipes which leave gaps big enough for these nimble rodents to get through.

One of the best pest control measures you can take against mice is to stop them finding a way in. Visual inspection of your property is a good start, especially if this is carried out by a pest control expert, who will be able to make you aware of potential entry points you might not have considered.

Another easy step is to make sure all potential sources of food are inaccessible to mice. They chew their way through paper, cardboard and even wood to get to a meal. Securing food in plastic or metal containers will keep them out. Keeping your home or businesses premises clean will reduce the amount of food waste lying around, providing mice with less of an incentive to find a way in.

Get rid of mice as soon as you spot the problem

Unhygienic and unsightly, mice can also do considerable damage to your property once inside. They’ll pull out insulation from inside walls and lofts, makes nests in stored textiles, and can even create electrical problems by chewing wires.

All of which means it’s important to get rid of mice the moment they arrive. Because they are a common pest control problem, there is no shortage of options available. Poison, traps and electronic deterrents are just some of your choices.

Do-it-yourself pest control measures will often get rid of mice if they have not had much time to breed. A well-established infestation can be much harder to remove, because of both the number of mice and the variety of hiding places they will have created for themselves.

It can be surprisingly common to have mice in your London property. But they can usually be removed relatively quickly and easily, and with the right actions, you can prevent mice from returning.

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What to do after Flea Extermination

Even when your premises have undergone a thorough Fleas Extermination process, there is no guarantee that the pests will not be back. Fleas are particularly hardy pests, with the capacity to remain dormant for years before reviving when they sense potential food sources nearby.

Where pest control measures have entirely eliminated the flea population, preventing their return means identifying and closing their routes into your premises. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done, as fleas are often spread by being carried in the fur of dogs or cats.

However, there are measures you can take to reduce the chances of flea problems reoccurring.

Pest control actions after flea extermination

There are several different types of flea but all have common characteristics. In particular, they all feed on the blood of different types of animal, and spread by laying eggs which often fall from the host.

This means it is just as important to deal with flea eggs as it is to tackle the adult fleas. The eggs will fall from the host, usually a cat or dog, at any point during the day. A high proportion is found in their bedding, but a number will be spread across the rest of the area they move in, such as your home or workplace.

These eggs are invisible to the naked eye. To remove them before they have a chance to hatch you should:

  • Where possible, put animal bedding on hard surfaces.
  • Regularly wash pet bedding, ideally each week and at high temperature.
  • Vacuum soft furnishings which the animals come into contact with.
  • Groom your pet while it stands on a hard floor or even a white sheet, where dislodged fleas and their eggs will be visible.

Be alert to the signs of a flea problem

While fleas can spread diseases, the main problem they cause is skin irritation in the host animal. This is usually a cat or dog, but can occasionally be a human.

The irritation is due to the flea bites. These become itchy, causing the host considerable discomfort. A clue that your cat or dog may be carrying fleas is regular scratching of the same part of the body, often in an irritated manner.

Small children are at a higher risk of being bitten by fleas, as they have much more contact with floor surfaces. Some could be allergic to flea bites, giving them an itchy rash on their skin.

If you are a pet owner, there will always be a chance of a flea problem reoccurring. Even if you keep your own pets scrupulously clean, they could pick up fleas through contact with other animals, or from animals visiting your home or place of work.

The best way to stop fleas from becoming a problem is to know what to do after flea extermination, and to take consistent pest control and prevention measures.

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Are cockroaches common in London?

If you’ve spent time travelling around London, there’s a good chance you’ll have spotted a cockroach or two. Even if you haven’t seen one yourself, you have probably been very close to one.

Cockroaches are just one of London’s pest control problems, and they are a problem that seems to be getting worse. The London Evening Standard recently reported that the city’s firefighters are discovering an increasing number of cockroach-infested temporary dwellings. Local media often contains stories of restaurants and hotels where infestations have been discovered.

With pest control budgets being cut by councils and firms looking to save money, it’s no surprise that cockroach numbers seem to be rising. These hardy insects have developed the capability to survive under many different conditions, and their ability to breed quickly makes them difficult to eradicate.

Why cockroaches are a problem in London

These ugly brown or black insects can be found in a huge variety of environments right across the city. Homes, hotels, warehouses and even trains and buses are all common habitats for cockroaches, some of which can grow to over an inch (30mm) in length.

Most of them live out of sight, in the dark spaces under cupboards and appliances, and in cracks and crevices. They prefer to come out at night and if you disturb them by turning on a light, they’ll scuttle back to somewhere dark.

Cockroaches thrive in these places because of the warmth and the abundant food supply. They will eat virtually anything, but can also survive for long periods without food or water.

In addition to doing damage and being unpleasant to look at, cockroaches are a pest because they can carry a number of different diseases, including salmonella and dysentery. Any food they come into contact with becomes tainted, and they give off an unpleasant odour.

What to do if you have a cockroach problem

If you think your house or business premises is providing a home to cockroaches, you should take prompt action. The longer you leave them, the harder they will be to eradicate. Cockroaches are tough survivors and it often requires the persistence of a pest control expert to get rid of them completely.

Signs of an infestation include finding droppings or smear marks on surfaces, discovering damage to foodstuffs or paper containers, and encountering an unpleasant musty smell. You may also find the insects themselves if you look into cracks or beneath cupboards or go into the area at night.

Immediate actions to take include putting all foods into strong, sealable containers and promptly clearing up spills of food and liquid, including crumbs, on surfaces, including the floor. Also, tidy up the area to remove possible hiding places.

You can buy DIY cockroach products that may help deal with the problem. But calling in a professional will give you access to stronger insecticides, along with expert advice on how to prevent the insects returning. Just because cockroaches are becoming more common in London does not mean they have a to be a problem for you.

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Tony’s Tales – Rats in the Kitchen

Tony Halliday, our boss, has spent years on the front line of pest control in London. His tales of strange situations and even stranger customers would fill volumes. He’s allowed us to record some of the skirmishes he’s experienced in his battle against vermin in Southwark and beyond.

A lot of Tony’s pest control stories feature Rats. These unsavory rodents breed in the old London sewers, making their burrows in the cracks and crevices of decaying Victorian brickwork and broken pipes.

Not surprisingly, rats often turn up in kitchens. They’re always hungry and always looking for food. In older houses, often those which have not been so well looked after, there are plenty of gaps and holes through which the rats can slip in.

On one call-out in Southwark, Tony and his mate were met by a burly South American bloke who didn’t speak a word of English. Tony tried to explain why they were there and the South American responded by waving his arms around and firing off a torrent of words in a foreign language.

Eventually the South American seemed to calm down and led Tony through to the kitchen, a ramshackle affair that had seen much better days. There, on top of the washing machine, peering out from under the worktop, was a rat.

Despite his size, the South American refused to enter the room and simply pointed from the doorway. Tony and his mate knew that they had to get rid of the rat and take measures to protect against other vermin.

Catching a rat is relatively easy using modern pest control measures, such as sticky boards. Unfortunately, this encounter was before Tony’s team had such equipment. So he was forced to hunt the rat down to catch and dispatch it.

This particular rat had a strong sense of self-preservation and did not want to be caught. It quickly disappeared, leaving Tony and his mate to begin a cupboard by cupboard search. They removed kickboards and emptied cupboards as they methodically closed in on the creature.

Looking into one cupboard, Tony thought he heard a noise from the back. He grabbed his torch, put his head in the cupboard, and found himself literally face-to-face with the rat, which was hiding in a saucepan.

For the rat, it was almost a case of out of the frying pan into the fire. Tony dealt with the rodent quickly and efficiently. The South American, despite being unable to speak a word of English, understood that the job had been done and was effusive in his gratitude to the pest controllers.

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