Category Archives: Rodents

Bypest London Pest Control Services – helping you get rid of Residential Pest problems

If you have a problem with pest control, we can help. We cover both commercial and residential pest management. Our technicians know what is needed for successful, effective Pest Control.

We offer a free site survey to assess what is needed and formulate a plan especially to deal with your issue, providing you with a quotation for the work.

Our cost-effective service can tackle pest control and prevention on any scale – whether it’s a wasp nest at your home or an environmental issue at a large business.

Our staff can help with any enquiry, even if you are not sure of the type of pest or the scale of the problem.  As well as pest extermination and control, we provide rodent and insect proofing to make sure your home or business remains pest free.

No-fuss pest extermination

Our discreet and professional service means you are in good hands.

At Bypest, we always:

• Use approved and tested pesticides when needed

• Comply with all health and safety standards and legislation

• Conduct comprehensive risk assessments

• Maintain the highest level of training and understanding across our fully-qualified staff

Pest Control Services

We value customer service and all enquiries to Bypest are answered within two hours. Our complete service includes assessment, treatment and prevention of London Pest Control issues.

Below are the main types of pest that our technicians deal with.

Rats Control  

Signs that you may have a rat infestation include seeing holes, droppings, or notice the damage caused by chewing. Rats are nocturnal, so you won’t necessarily see the rats themselves. Common types of rat that you may have a problem with include the Norway rat and the ship rat. We have the expertise to deal with Rats Control, however big the problem is.

Mice Control

Mice will often cause lots of damage, nibbling on and spoiling food, and leaving urine and droppings. Like many pests, mice are unhygienic and can pass on disease, so it’s particularly important to take mice control seriously at a place of business.

Mice will often nest in undisturbed parts of a home or building. Our knowledgeable technicians know how to find and treat a mice infestation.

Cockroaches Control

The presence of cockroaches can cause terrible damage to a business’s reputation, let alone the actual damage they cause and potential to spread disease.

If you have a problem with cockroaches, call us at Bypest. We understand their behaviour, where they are likely to be nesting, and how to deal with them.

Wasps Control

Wasps can be aggressive and sting and any wasp infestation or nest should always be treated with caution. Different species of wasps will act in different ways.

Wasps will often nest in bushes, lofts and wall cavities. Never try to block up a hole if you think it leads to a nest, and never remove the nest yourself. Our fully qualified technicians can safely remove wasps nests from your home or business.

Flies Control

Flies are an unsanitary pest as they spread disease by moving from rotting food, to rubbish, to food and cutlery that are exposed.

We are all used to seeing flies around seasonally, but a professional pest control company should be used for larger infestations.

Fleas Control

Fleas lay their eggs in carpets, on our pets, and even on bedding and clothing. Warm homes provide a perfect temperature for them to breed.

Signs of a flea problem include your pet scratching itself and noticing tiny specks of dirt that are flea faeces. Fleas can also bite people, causing itchy and irritated skin.

Our effective flea control considers not just your pet but how fleas live in the home and how to remove them for good.

Moths Control

Moths can cause a lot of damage during the larval stage. Larvae may have been carried into your home or business via clothing, food or furniture.

At Bypest, we can asses any moth issue you have. We will locate the source of the problem and remove it.

Bedbugs Control

Often the sign of a bedbug problem is seeing their skin or their droppings. We can tackle bedbug problems with our safe, integrated bedbugs removal service.

If you are concerned about a possible bedbug infestation, give us a call. We provide professional bedbugs fumigation for hotels and bed and breakfasts in London and the M25. We can also help with bedbug prevention measures.

Pigeons Control

Pigeons are a nuisance with their droppings, noise and, as pigeons can pass on disease to humans, are seen as an unhygienic blight.

If you have a pigeon or avian problem at your business or home, Bypest can help. Our pigeon prevention measures include wires, spikes and netting to stop pigeons gathering and fouling at your business premises.

Ants Control

We can assess and advise on an ant a problem at your home or business, including the removal of nests. Sometimes adjoining buildings will need to be treated, our fully qualified staff can advise on this.

Using effective methods, we can eliminate ant colonies and deter ants from nesting in your building.

Squirrels Control

A squirrel nest can be found in lofts, voids and wall cavities. Like rats, squirrels will gnaw and can cause damage to buildings.

Unlike the red squirrel, the grey squirrel is prevalent in the UK and is not a protected species. Our fully qualified team can remove squirrels from lofts and buildings and advise on prevention measures.

Bypest London Pest Control Company  offers a Comprehensive Pest Control Services for all kind of Pest Control Problems throughout London and around M25 Area.

Do Rats hibernate during the Winter?

You might think that pest control work quietens down during the winter, because quite a few nuisance animals and insects go into hibernation.

But lots of household pests, including rats and mice, remain active all year round. The longer and colder winter nights make your home, garden and workplace more attractive to these rodents, who are always looking for food, and for somewhere warm and dry to nest.

Wasps and other insect pests might become almost invisible during the winter months, but they’re simply dormant and will be back next spring. Colder weather gives you a chance to deal with holes and gaps where they may have nested this year, helping prevent their return.

Pest control during the winter months

Taking action to prevent rats and other pests is as important during the winter as at any other time of year. The most basic precautions include not leaving any food outdoors overnight, and keeping food preparation and storage areas clean and tidy.

Leftover pet food or food spillages, indoors or out, are hugely attractive to rats and mice looking for something to eat.

Another simple pest control task is to tidy up your garden or other outdoor area. Piles of wood or dry leaves can quickly become comfortable homes for rodents. Compost bins are particularly popular, especially if you put food scraps into them.

Outbuildings, such as sheds and children’s playhouses, can also become places of safety for rats and mice. Here they can live undisturbed for weeks at a time, protected from the extremes of the British winter climate. Make it part of your winter routine to check these buildings, and to fill any obvious cracks or gaps through which rodents could get in.

Indoor pests thrive during the winter

Fleas, moths and bedbugs are common indoor pests that don’t pay much attention to what the weather’s doing outside. Whatever the time of year, they continue breeding and spreading themselves around your home or workplace.

The cooler temperatures slow down their reproduction, but our centrally-heated buildings protect them from the cold. Because they live off us and our pets, fleas and bedbugs have more opportunity to spread during the winter, as we spend more time indoors.

Cockroaches, the scourge of many kitchens, also continue to be active during the winter months. In the event that they find themselves short of food, they can, like many pests, survive for a long time on virtually nothing.

Many people think that because pests are not seen so often during the winter, they are less of a problem. Some even believe that rats and mice do hibernate. But experienced pest controllers know that winter is as busy a time of year as any, and that it’s also a good time to act to prevent more serious pest issues from occurring in the spring.

What type of Mice live in London houses?

Although very small, the mouse is a widely feared pest, probably due to its unpredictable and quick movements. If you have a mouse in your house, you may hear scampering feet above your ceiling or inside your cavity walls at night. Or you may discover mouse droppings or gnawed cereal boxes in the kitchen. Another tell-tale sign is the distinctive odour that mice emit.

When it comes to solving a mouse problem, it does not really matter what type of mice live in London houses. All the different types of wild mice have the potential to bring infection and destruction into your home.

Just like rats, mice carry disease and can contaminate foodstuffs with their fur, eating and urine, which can cause salmonella poisoning and gastroenteritis. In addition, they can damage your property by gnawing through wood, cables and into containers to get at food.

Types of mice in London

There are four types of mice living wild in and around London: the house mouse, the field or wood mouse, the yellow necked mouse and the harvest mouse. Two of these are pests – the house mouse and the field mouse. If you have mice in your London home, they will almost definitely be house mice.

The house mouse. This is London’s most common mouse. The adult house mouse measures around 7 to 9cm long with a thin tail of about the same length. Its fur is smooth and brown-grey in colour, becoming lighter underneath. It has quite large ears, small eyes, a small pointed head and small feet.

The field mouse. The field mouse is slightly larger than the house mouse and its coat is a warm brown colour rather than the dullish grey-brown of the house mouse. It has larger eyes and ears than the house mouse, making it quite easy to spot the difference. A field mouse can survive outdoors, but will sometimes find its way into a house, where it can breed and become a pest control problem.

Where will a house mouse nest?

The house mouse likes to live indoors. It can get in through the tiniest hole, just the size of a pencil, and will build a mouse nest in a warm place where there is a plentiful supply of food and nesting material. Loft spaces, cavity walls and the gaps under floors are popular places for mice to nest.

House mice eat almost anything that humans eat, but their preference is cereal. They don’t need much water, absorbing this from their food. They are most active at night, when they go in search of something to eat.

How to get rid of a mouse infestation

There are two main ways of dealing with mice – traps and poison – but if you have an infestation, it is likely that you will need the services of a professional pest controller to eradicate your problem. Mice are sporadic eaters, making it difficult to eliminate a whole colony. They are also surprisingly resistant to poisons. A pest controller will be able to help you mouse-proof your home and efficiently remove the mouse population.

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What foods or smells do Rats or voles avoid?

One of the most effective ways to prevent rats or voles becoming a pest control problem is to discourage them from approaching your property. Traps and poisons will catch or kill at least some of the rodents when they arrive, but making your premises unattractive can be more cost-effective, and less unpleasant.

Knowing what foods or smells rats or voles avoid will help to keep them away. How effective any particular odours are at deterring these rodents will depend on the circumstances, such as the availability of food sources and the hardiness of the particular pests.

Peppermint. Some rats and voles will avoid the smell of peppermint. Soaking cotton wool balls in peppermint oil or sprinkling it on the areas where the rodents are known to run can act as a deterrent and encourage them to find alternative food sources. Natural peppermint may also help deter rats and voles but it is not always effective.

Cat litter. Cats are natural predators of rats and voles and these pests will instinctively avoid areas which are scented with the smell of feline urine. Having a cat may be sufficient to deter rodents from making their nests in your home or office as they will naturally produce the smell alerting them to the presence of a potential enemy. The use of ammonia on cat litter increases the pungency of the aroma, increasing the likelihood that it will deter rats and voles.

Predator urine. An alternative to cat litter is the use of a pest repellent that combines the urine of rodent predators such as cats, foxes, weasels and ferrets with other organic substances to form pellets. The smell fools the rats and voles into thinking that their enemies are nearby, which encourages them to stay away.

Other repellent smells. There are several other odours that may deter rats and voles from settling in your property. Moth balls can work, but are not recommended for long-term use because of their potential effect on human health. Another repelling odour is that of toilet cakes – the strongly scented blocks designed to keep toilet bowls fresh. Broken into pieces, the smell that they give off may repel rats and voles. Garlic and castor oil have also been known to work.

Repelling plants. Some plants act as a natural deterrent of voles – such as castor beans, marigolds, daffodils, alliums including onions, and caper spurge.

What do rats and voles eat?

Rats have a very keen sense of smell and are able to sniff out food from over a mile away. They are omnivorous, meaning they eat anything that humans do, from cereals to vegetables, and bread to fat. They will also eat pet food stored in boxes or bags.

Voles eat a mostly vegetarian diet. This includes plants, grass, roots and bulbs as well as berries, seeds, nuts, fungi and fruit. Vole colonies can strip bark off trees and devour fields of crops. They will occasionally eat snails and insects, but usually only when other food is scarce.

Storing food within airtight containers will help reduce the spread of odours which could attract the attention of vermin.

Will smells get rid of rats and voles?

Whilst these smells may help prevent rats and voles from settling in your property, they won’t solve a rat or vole infestation. For this, you’ll need a pest control strategy that eliminates access to food as well as killing or driving the vermin away. A professional pest controller will be able to assess what action is required and eradicate the problem before further damage occurs.

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Passionate Pests and Reproducing Rodents

One of the distinctive features of pests is their ability to reproduce. We thought it only fair that as it’s Valentine’s Day we should do a little research into the love lives of the creatures we’re commonly called to deal with.

Brown rats – There’s no shortage of sex in the city among these ubiquitous rodents. When they’re not rummaging through rubbish and scurrying around sewers, they’re probably hard at work creating the next generation. The average female Rat can turn out a brood of up to 14 ugly babies in just three weeks.

Wasps – Frustration might be high for the black and yellow scourge of the summer picnic, because in their world sex is a pastime reserved for royalty. The queen only equips selected males with what they need to pursue the relatively small number of females.

Cockroaches – An intimate dinner for two isn’t quite the same if you’re sharing a table with one of these closet romantics. Unseen by us they can engage in complex courtship rituals involving bold posturing and making distinctive sounds by rubbing their body parts together.

Fleas – Apparently the male flea is supremely well-endowed and his equipment also includes two antennae with what look like sink plungers on the end. It’s thought these help him to hang on to the female because when she jumps it’s with a rate of acceleration equivalent to a space rocket lifting off.

Bedbugs – A life between the sheets hasn’t made the average male Bedbug very discerning. They’ll try to mate with any bedbug smaller than themselves, which causes predictable problems. Once they’ve caught up with a female, she’ll lay around 3-4 eggs per day.

Lovebugs – Okay, we don’t come across these in London, but we couldn’t resist including them. Lovebugs, or honeymoon flies, are found in the southern United States where they are, at certain times of year, a pest. They’re also, as their name implies, intensely amorous. When they mate the couple remain bonded together for days, even flying while entwined.

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Rodent Bites Can Hurt More Than Your Pride

It’s bad enough being bitten by a rat. But it’s particularly humiliating and distressing to be bitten on the penis.

That’s what an American claimed to have endured recently, when he’d been locked up for a short spell in a rodent infested prison cell near New York. He said that the rat came out of a mattress and bit him twice, once once on his hand and once in a much more intimate location.

He was probably attacked by the extremely common Norwegian or Norway Rat, also known as the Brown Rat. These are the dirty, unpleasant rodents that thrive on the rubbish we too often leave around us. With their sharp teeth these sewer-loving vermin are a major pest control problem, gnawing through wood and thick plastics on their relentless search for something to devour.

The chances of being bitten by a rat are relatively low in Britain, if official statistics are to be believed. But rats aren’t the only pest that can attack with their teeth.

We were all shocked by the headlines, last June, which reported how an urban fox viciously injured twin baby girls as they slept in their Hackney home. More recently a female lawyer lost part of an ear to a fox in Fulham and woman from Sussex had the tip of a finger bitten off by one as she slept.

Other furred vermin, such as Grey Squirrels and Mice, can also inflict a nasty injury with their teeth. But quite aside from the shock and pain of being unexpectedly bitten, victims also risk catching something very unpleasant from their attackers.

The American man who suffered the unfortunate bite complained that he’d subsequently been forced to endure a series of injections to protect him from rabies. While British pests are highly unlikely to carry this disease, they can transmit a host of other potentially fatal conditions including Weil’s disease, salmonella and tuberculosis.

Anyone unlucky enough to be bitten by a Rodent or fox should get medical help. In 2007 a Sussex businessman died after he was bitten by a pet rat and ignored advice from NHS Direct, who told him to visit his doctor.

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