Category Archives: Pigeons

Bypest London Pest Control Services – helping you get rid of Residential Pest problems

If you have a problem with pest control, we can help. We cover both commercial and residential pest management. Our technicians know what is needed for successful, effective Pest Control.

We offer a free site survey to assess what is needed and formulate a plan especially to deal with your issue, providing you with a quotation for the work.

Our cost-effective service can tackle pest control and prevention on any scale – whether it’s a wasp nest at your home or an environmental issue at a large business.

Our staff can help with any enquiry, even if you are not sure of the type of pest or the scale of the problem.  As well as pest extermination and control, we provide rodent and insect proofing to make sure your home or business remains pest free.

No-fuss pest extermination

Our discreet and professional service means you are in good hands.

At Bypest, we always:

• Use approved and tested pesticides when needed

• Comply with all health and safety standards and legislation

• Conduct comprehensive risk assessments

• Maintain the highest level of training and understanding across our fully-qualified staff

Pest Control Services

We value customer service and all enquiries to Bypest are answered within two hours. Our complete service includes assessment, treatment and prevention of London Pest Control issues.

Below are the main types of pest that our technicians deal with.

Rats Control  

Signs that you may have a rat infestation include seeing holes, droppings, or notice the damage caused by chewing. Rats are nocturnal, so you won’t necessarily see the rats themselves. Common types of rat that you may have a problem with include the Norway rat and the ship rat. We have the expertise to deal with Rats Control, however big the problem is.

Mice Control

Mice will often cause lots of damage, nibbling on and spoiling food, and leaving urine and droppings. Like many pests, mice are unhygienic and can pass on disease, so it’s particularly important to take mice control seriously at a place of business.

Mice will often nest in undisturbed parts of a home or building. Our knowledgeable technicians know how to find and treat a mice infestation.

Cockroaches Control

The presence of cockroaches can cause terrible damage to a business’s reputation, let alone the actual damage they cause and potential to spread disease.

If you have a problem with cockroaches, call us at Bypest. We understand their behaviour, where they are likely to be nesting, and how to deal with them.

Wasps Control

Wasps can be aggressive and sting and any wasp infestation or nest should always be treated with caution. Different species of wasps will act in different ways.

Wasps will often nest in bushes, lofts and wall cavities. Never try to block up a hole if you think it leads to a nest, and never remove the nest yourself. Our fully qualified technicians can safely remove wasps nests from your home or business.

Flies Control

Flies are an unsanitary pest as they spread disease by moving from rotting food, to rubbish, to food and cutlery that are exposed.

We are all used to seeing flies around seasonally, but a professional pest control company should be used for larger infestations.

Fleas Control

Fleas lay their eggs in carpets, on our pets, and even on bedding and clothing. Warm homes provide a perfect temperature for them to breed.

Signs of a flea problem include your pet scratching itself and noticing tiny specks of dirt that are flea faeces. Fleas can also bite people, causing itchy and irritated skin.

Our effective flea control considers not just your pet but how fleas live in the home and how to remove them for good.

Moths Control

Moths can cause a lot of damage during the larval stage. Larvae may have been carried into your home or business via clothing, food or furniture.

At Bypest, we can asses any moth issue you have. We will locate the source of the problem and remove it.

Bedbugs Control

Often the sign of a bedbug problem is seeing their skin or their droppings. We can tackle bedbug problems with our safe, integrated bedbugs removal service.

If you are concerned about a possible bedbug infestation, give us a call. We provide professional bedbugs fumigation for hotels and bed and breakfasts in London and the M25. We can also help with bedbug prevention measures.

Pigeons Control

Pigeons are a nuisance with their droppings, noise and, as pigeons can pass on disease to humans, are seen as an unhygienic blight.

If you have a pigeon or avian problem at your business or home, Bypest can help. Our pigeon prevention measures include wires, spikes and netting to stop pigeons gathering and fouling at your business premises.

Ants Control

We can assess and advise on an ant a problem at your home or business, including the removal of nests. Sometimes adjoining buildings will need to be treated, our fully qualified staff can advise on this.

Using effective methods, we can eliminate ant colonies and deter ants from nesting in your building.

Squirrels Control

A squirrel nest can be found in lofts, voids and wall cavities. Like rats, squirrels will gnaw and can cause damage to buildings.

Unlike the red squirrel, the grey squirrel is prevalent in the UK and is not a protected species. Our fully qualified team can remove squirrels from lofts and buildings and advise on prevention measures.

Bypest London Pest Control Company  offers a Comprehensive Pest Control Services for all kind of Pest Control Problems throughout London and around M25 Area.

When do feral pigeons lay eggs?

Feral pigeons create a nuisance with their continual scavenging for food and their unsightly droppings, which can be extremely damaging to stone, brick and wood. They also carry a variety of parasites and diseases, some of which can be harmful to humans.

If you have a Pigeon Pest Control problem, knowing when and how the birds breed will help you to find a solution.

Like so many of the other pests that live in London, feral pigeons are capable of breeding all year round. Captive bred pigeons can lay a new batch of eggs every month, but their feral cousins typically produce between two and four broods a year.

Pigeon pest control by preventing nesting

While pigeons can lay their eggs at any time of year, they are more likely to nest during the spring and summer months, when the weather is warmer. Making it impossible for the birds to nest at this time of year is an important step in a pigeon removal strategy.

Feral pigeons usually build their nests on ledges outside or inside buildings. Being descended from Rock Doves, who live wild around coastal cliffs or in mountainous areas, they have learned to exploit the nooks and crevices in tall city constructions. It’s this ability to build nests in urban areas that has led to a pigeon pest control problem in London and other towns and cities.

Roof spaces are a particular favourite, being high, and full of beams and other flat surfaces. Here the birds can lay their eggs, undisturbed and usually sheltered from extreme weather. The eggs hatch within three weeks of being laid and the squabs, or baby pigeons, are able to fly within a month.

Within six months, they join the breeding population, creating a new generation of pigeon pests.

How to stop feral pigeons building nests

Where pigeons are nesting inside roof voids and other spaces, this can be stopped by the use of deterrents, or completely preventing access.

A variety of devices are available which discourage feral pigeons and other bird pests from taking up residence, including plastic bird spikes, brightly-coloured bird-scarers or even inflatable models of predators. Where specific access points are identified, such as broken windows, these can be repaired or covered by netting.

Pigeon spikes and bird-repellent gel can also be used on the outside of buildings. Spikes make it impossible to land, or uncomfortable to roost, while pigeons don’t like the feel of tacky bird-repellent gel. This ensures they won’t want to stay around long enough to build a nest or lay eggs.

While you can take some pigeon pest control measures yourself, using a professional pest controller brings the added benefit of years of experience. As with all pests, feral pigeons have particular habits and preferences and an expert will be able to supply the most cost-effective, and long-lasting, solution to your pigeon problem.

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Where do Feral Pigeons spend their days?

London’s biggest airborne pest, the feral pigeon, has recently become something of a film star. The evil Professor Moriaty, adversary to London’s most famous detective in the movie, “Sherlock Holmes: A game of shadows”, has a habit of feeding the winged vermin in the city’s parks.

But when they’re not to be seen alongside the likes of Jared Harris, Jude Law, Robert Downey Jr. and Stephen Fry where do feral pigeons spend their days?

‘Rats with wings’ were not always pests

Today’s feral pigeon, or town pigeon, is descended from birds who were once bred in captivity, often for meat. This happened for thousands of years. Some of the world’s earliest writings, such as Egyptian hieroglyphics, mention the domestication of the Rock Dove or Rock Pigeon.

Over the centuries, millions of birds have escaped from captivity and formed huge colonies in our towns and cities. Trafalgar Square alone was home to around 35,000 birds before the Mayor of London took action to reduce their numbers.

A day in the life of a feral pigeon

As their name suggests, Rock Doves live on cliffs. Today’s tall buildings with their miles of ledges provide an attractive alternative to their feral pigeon descendants.

It’s here that birds begin the day, on some precarious perch or rooftop that’s not been coated in Pigeon Spikes or Netting. Some will be nesting, as pigeons can lay eggs at any time of year.

They like to nest in groups, if they can, with derelict buildings being favoured spots for housing a pigeon nursery. Both parents take turns at incubating the eggs, while their partners go in search of food.

Much of the pigeons’ food comes directly from the human inhabitants of the town or city. Some feed the birds deliberately, although this is increasingly discouraged. But many of us feed feral Pigeons by accident, by dropping pieces of food onto roads and pavements. They also eat berries, seeds and insects.

Pigeons can live for up to fifteen years in captivity. However, it’s unlikely they survive this long in the wild, with most feral pigeons probably dying within their first five years of life.

Feral pigeons pollute and damage

While pigeons help to keep our streets clean of food waste, they make plenty of mess of their own. Stonework, vehicle paintwork and the personal dignity of town and city dwellers are the daily victims of pigeon droppings.

Once prized as a quality fertilizer, pigeon excrement is not just unsightly, it’s also highly corrosive and a health hazard. The acids it contains will eat their way through paint, wood, steel and stone. Millions of pounds have been spent restoring historic buildings which had suffered major damage from a build-up of pigeon droppings.

Their waste, and the birds themselves, can also contain parasites and other sources of diseases. Perhaps it’s no surprise that the feral pigeon has been associated with the villainous Professor Moriaty on the silver screen, as both can present a rather nasty hazard to human health.

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A Pigeon’s Eye View of the Royal Wedding Procession

As William and Kate’s big day approaches, we decided to celebrate by taking a slightly different perspective on some of the sites they’ll pass during their horse-drawn trip from the Abbey to the Palace.

Westminster Abbey

Pigeons love medieval churches, particularly the soaring cathedrals with their towers and spires, wide ledges and cosy crevices. However, the birds aren’t particularly welcome on ecclesiastical property, either inside or out, despite making a number of appearances in the Bible.

In the thousand years since Westminster’s construction, pigeons have faced an increasing range of deterrents including rows of anti-roosting spikes, acres of netting, and a variety of Bird Scarers.

Whilst weddings are traditionally accompanied by symbols of good luck, measures will be taken to ensure that pigeons won’t be able to deposit their own sign of best wishes on the bride and groom.

Downing Street

Larry might be the latest and Humphrey the most well-known, but they’re simply some of the latest in a distinguished line of cats appointed as government pest controllers. The first Treasury mouser documented in history was owned by Cardinal Wolsey, who kept it by his side as Lord Chancellor, during the reign of Henry VIII.

The Cenotaph

As the wedding procession passes the focal point of national remembrance for fallen British servicemen, it’s good to recall that not all pigeons are thought of as pests. In fact, over 30 have been awarded the Dickin Medal for displaying conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in support of military forces.

Horse Guards Parade

This royal parade ground is no stranger to spectator events, hosting the Trouping of the Colour, displays in honour of the Queen’s birthday and, in 2012, it’ll be transformed into an Olympic volley ball arena. But according to Westminster City Council pest control experts, the number of rats watching events is down on previous years.

Steve Harrison, Westminster’s director of premises management, recently said: “We pride ourselves on acting quickly and will continue our work to limit the number of rats and other vermin in the city.”

Buckingham Palace

Tight security at the royal residence hasn’t kept uninvited guests out of the royal kitchens. With pantries and larders groaning under enough goodies to serve up to 600 people at one sitting, it’s no surprise that rats and mice want a slice of Windsor pudding, pie, cake or even just a plain cracker.

A royal Rodent Problem occurred as recently as October last year. However, the only teeth nibbling at the delicacies of William and Kate’s wedding breakfast will be those of their chosen guests.

The rest of us will have to make do with street party fare, bank holiday barbecues or whatever else comes our way.

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Pigeons – More Than Fowl Vermin?

The robin and pigeon both enjoy an iconic status in Britain. The cheery, red-breasted chap brightens our winters inside and out. He’s a common sight in our gardens and on our Christmas cards.

His larger cousin, the feral pigeon, has pecked itself into a symbol of city living and formed an unassailable bond with a national institution, Trafalgar Square. When Ken Livingstone, the Mayor of London at the time, tried to evict pigeons from the landmark in 2000, he met with unexpected resistance from the birds’ human supporters.

Feral pigeons in LondonIs the little bird who visits your home or office a pest or a pleasure? A bold little robin is entertaining the folk of Aberdeen this winter, popping into his local Co-op for a daily breakfast of crumbs. But he might not be so welcome if he were a Feral Pigeon. Despite having a small, vocal fan base, feral pigeons are not popular with most city dwellers. They’re called ‘rats with wings’ by many of us. They make unwelcome visits to homes and commercial premises across our cities, perching on window sills and roofs and leaving unwelcome and damaging deposits. Their acidic droppings eat away stone surfaces and car paintwork.

Pigeons are often the target of pest control measures, designed either to deter them from moving in or to persuade them it’s time to move on. The brand new Ordnance Survey building in Southampton has a kite flying from its roof, which carries the image of a bird of prey. So far it’s proved an effective pigeon deterrent.

Unlike the little robin, who usually travels alone, feral pigeons move in packs. Well, flocks to be precise, but that term doesn’t capture the arrogant swagger of fat grey birds with aggressive territorial ambitions. They appear to eat almost anything and it’s by living off our rubbish that they’ve earned their reputation as aerial vermin.

Feral pigeons are descendants of the Rock pigeons that we domesticated hundreds of years ago. While we might now despise these grimy, ungainly birds, they’ve been dependant on us for food for generations. But that’s not to say we should have to accept their mess and nuisance.

Effective pest control measures have significantly reduced the number of feral pigeons in London. The 4,000 in Trafalgar Square have been cut to around 200. If they continue to become less common, they might even win back a place in our affections, alongside the round, red robin.

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